Country Traditions

September 17, 2010

Housekeeping 1896

Filed under: Churning butter, gardening, laundry, recipes, sewing, soap making — Tags: , , — dmacc502 @ 11:50 am
"Good Housekeeping" magazine is one ...

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Posted by Miss KimAugust 16, 2010
From the 19th into the early 20th century the ever increasing number of middle class housewives found that having a “systematic” way with housekeeping details made for more leisure time for the housewife.
“Orderly, systematic work is the great time-saver in housekeeping, as is every other vocation in life.
A written programme, of which the following is suggestive, of the order in which the regular daily work is to be done, kept where it will serve as a constant reminder, will aid greatly in the establishment of habits of method in one’s work :
1. Make the fire ; fill the tea-kettle and reservoirs. Polish the stove, when needed.
2. Dust the kitchen, which should have been left clean and in good order the night before. Wash the hands preparatory to getting breakfast, as it is always essential to have the hands and finger nails clean before handling foods and cooking utensils.
3. Get breakfast.
4. Make any preparations for dinner which may require early attention.
5. Wash dishes, including dish towels; clean sinks, hoppers, and garbage receptacles, if any.
6. Extras. Under this division may be arranged different duties for regular days; as, for example, one day each week may be devoted to extra cleaning of cupboards, reservoirs, ovens, etc.; two other days to washing and cleaning the refrigerator, extra scouring of utensils and faucets, cleaning of lights, woodwork, walls, windows, and cellar, all of which require more or less of the housekeeper’s attention, though not always demanding daily care.
7. Put the kitchen to rights. This should be done after every meal before leaving the kitchen. At the close of the day’s work everything should be left in perfect order.
It is desirable to have the housework so planned that work which must be done regularly each week, as baking, washing, and ironing, shall have its own appointed day arranged as best suits the needs and convenience of the household. There is always a best way of performing even the simplest of household details ; seek out this most advantageous method and save time by employing it.—Mrs. E. E. Kellogg in Good Health.”
~Good Housekeeping Magazine 1896

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