Country Traditions

September 17, 2010

Weather Proverbs and Prognostics: Birds

Filed under: animals, gardening, weather, wisdom — Tags: , — dmacc502 @ 11:03 am
Domestic geese.

Image via Wikipedia

Whether you’re wondering when to expect rain, or if a cold winter or dry summer is ahead of you, birds have a way of helping us find out! Here is a collection of some of our favorite bird weather proverbs and prognostics.

  • Birds singing in the rain indicates fair weather approaching.
  • If birds in the autumn grow tame, the winter will be too cold for game. 
  • Partridges drumming in the fall means a mild and open winter.
  • Chickens cackle and owls howl just before rain. 
  • If crows fly in pairs, expect fine weather; a crow flying alone is a sign of foul weather.
  • When fowls roost in daytime, expect rain. 
  • The whiteness of a goose’s breastbone indicates the kind of winter: A red of dark-spotted bone means a cold and stormy winter; few or light-colored spots mean a mild winter.
  • When domestic geese walk east and fly west, expect cold weather. 
  • Hawks flying high means a clear sky. When they fly low, prepare for a blow. 
  • Petrels gathering under the stern of a ship indicates bad weather.
  • When the rooster goes crowing to bed, he will rise with watery head.
  • When seagulls fly inland, expect a storm. 
  • When the swallow’s nest is high, the summer is very dry. When the swallow buildeth low, you can safely reap and sow
  • http://www.almanac.com/content/weather-proverbs-and-prognostics-birds
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