Country Traditions

January 26, 2011

Video: How to butcher a whole lamb | Life and style | guardian.co.uk

Filed under: animals, family, recipes — dmacc502 @ 11:06 am
Carniceria
Image via Wikipedia

http://gu.com/p/29nt6

via Video: How to butcher a whole lamb | Life and style | guardian.co.uk.

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January 19, 2011

Black Pudding From Scratch (English) Recipe

Filed under: animals, farming, recipes — Tags: , , , , — dmacc502 @ 12:24 pm
Braised Pork Rillons, Black Pudding - Auction ...

Image by avlxyz via Flickr

� 1�1/4 �qt Fresh pig’s blood �

� 8�7/8 �oz Bread cut into cubes �

� 1�1/4 �qt Skim milk

� 1 �lb Cooked barley �

� 1 �lb Fresh beef suet

� 8 �oz Fine oatmeal �

� 1 �ts Salt �

� 2 �ts Ground black pepper

� 2 �ts Dried and crumbled mint �

Instructions

� 1. Put the bread cubes to soak in the milk in a warm oven. Do not heat the milk beyond blood temperature! Have the blood ready in a large bowl, and pour the warm milk and bread into it. Stir in the cooked barley. Grate the beef suet into the mixture and stir it up with the oatmeal. Season with the salt, pepper and mint.

� 2. Have ready 2 or three large roasting pans. Divide the mixture between them – they should not be more than 3/4 full. Bake in a moderate oven — 350 F – for about an hour or until the pudding is well cooked through. This makes a beautifully light pudding which will keep well in a cold larder.

� 3. Cut into squared and fry till heated through and the outside is crisp, in bacon fat or butter. Delicious for breakfast, or for supper with fried apples and mashed potato.

via Black Pudding From Scratch (English) Recipe.

January 9, 2011

Pheasant recipes: A pot full of deliciousness – Telegraph

Filed under: animals, family, herbs, recipes — Tags: , , , — dmacc502 @ 9:19 am

 

Pheasant recipes: A pot full of deliciousness – Telegraph.

 

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December 11, 2010

Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall's game recipes The Guardian

Filed under: animals, family, herbs, recipes — Tags: , , , — dmacc502 @ 10:06 am

Bouquet garni: thyme, bay leaves, sage

Image via Wikipedia Bouquet garni

Game soup

After you’ve enjoyed your roast pheasant or partridge, don’t just throw out the carcasses; instead, use them as the base for this tasty soup. It makes a great starter and is just the thing to pour into a Thermos to sustain you through a winter walk. Serves six, though it doubles or triples up very well.

Carcasses of 2-4 game birds
1 bouquet garni (made up of 3 parsley stalks, 2 small thyme sprigs, 1 rosemary sprig, 1 bay leaf)
6 juniper berries, crushed
8 black peppercorns
200g celeriac, cut into 1cm dice (save the peelings for use in the stock base)
2 large carrots, cut into 1cm dice
3 parsnips, cut into 1cm dice
Leftover scraps of meat pulled from the carcasses (optional)
1 tsp fresh thyme leaves
Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Put the carcasses in a large pan, pour in enough water to cover by about 4cm, bring to a bare simmer and skim off any scum that rises to the surface. After 15 minutes, add the bouquet garni, juniper berries, peppercorns and a small handful of well-scrubbed celeriac peelings. Cook at a very gentle simmer for three hours, topping up with water if it gets a little low. Strain the stock through a fine-meshed sieve into a clean pan. Bring the stock to a vigorous boil and reduce until it has a good depth of flavour. Add the vegetables, any leftover meat, if using, and the thyme, and simmer for 10 minutes until the vegetables are tender. Season with salt and pepper, and serve with good bread.

The River Cottage Everyday iPhone App, featuring seasonal recipes, tips and videos, is now available to download from iTunes. Go torivercottage.net for details.

October 25, 2010

A ploughing lesson for beginners | Life and style | guardian.co.uk

Filed under: animals, farming, gardening, tools — Tags: — dmacc502 @ 9:30 am
Rudolf Koller 001

Image via Wikipedia

A ploughing lesson for beginners | Life and style | guardian.co.uk.

via A ploughing lesson for beginners | Life and style | guardian.co.uk

First I held the plough and Walsh controlled the horses. Then we switched roles. Other than a jolt when the horses set off, it was surprisingly easy. Doing it all day would be a different matter, though …

October 11, 2010

Predicting Weather Using a Persimmon Seed!

Filed under: animals, farming, gardening, home remedies, weather, wisdom — Tags: , , , — dmacc502 @ 11:21 am
A fuyu persimmon fruit

Image via Wikipedia

According to folklore, you can predict the weather with apersimmon seed. Here’s how to do it:

Cut open a persimmon seed. (Find persimmon fruit in your local supermarket.)

Look at the shape of the kernel inside.

  • If the kernel is spoon-shaped, lots of heavy, wet snow will fall. Spoon = shovel!
  • If it is fork-shaped, you can expect powdery, light snow and a mild winter.
  • If the kernel is knife-shaped, expect to be “cut” by icy, cutting winds.

It’s best to use ripe seeds.

That’s it! Now, what did you see?                http://www.almanac.com/content/predicting-weather-using-persimmon-seed

 

Cricket Chirps: Nature's Thermometer

Filed under: animals, farming, gardening, home remedies, weather, wisdom — Tags: , , — dmacc502 @ 11:16 am
Thermometer with Fahrenheit units on the outer...

Image via Wikipedia

Did you know that you can tell the temperature by counting the chirps of a cricket? It’s true! Here’s the formula:

To convert cricket chirps to degrees Fahrenheit, count number of chirps in 14 seconds then add 40 to get temperature.

Example: 30 chirps + 40 = 70° F

To convert cricket chirps to degrees Celsius, count number of chirps in 25 seconds, divide by 3, then add 4 to get temperature.

Example: 48 chirps /(divided by) 3 + 4 = 20° C

http://www.almanac.com/cricket-chirps-temperature-thermometer

October 8, 2010

Attract Night Crawlers to Your Garden – Organic Gardening – Ask Our Experts Blog

Filed under: animals, gardening — Tags: , , , , , — dmacc502 @ 5:47 pm
Lumbricus terrestris (Nachtaufnahme)

Image via Wikipedia

Attract Night Crawlers to Your Garden – Organic Gardening – Ask Our Experts Blog.

via Attract Night Crawlers to Your Garden – Organic Gardening – Ask Our Experts Blog.

Several species of helpful earthworms will magically appear as you dig compost and other forms of organic matter into your soil. The most important species in terms of soil improvement is the night crawler (Lumbricus terrestris), which specializes in taking organic matter from the soil’s surface and storing it in underground middens, which are combination food supply/trash heaps. As these middens decompose, they become nutrient-rich hot spots in plants’ root zones. In addition, night crawler tunnels create open channels for water and plant roots, which can make a huge difference in tight clay soil.

Using mulches will encourage night crawlers, as will creating grassy mowed pathways, which you might think of as night crawler reservoirs. But the best thing you can do to increase night crawler populations is to place piles of compost and mulch in or near your garden. More night crawler activity goes on around the edges of compost and mulch piles than anywhere else in your garden.

Chances are good that providing habitat for night crawlers will attract them in noticeable numbers, but if you want to import worms to colonize your new garden area, you can use night crawlers that are sold as fishing bait.#mce_temp_url#

October 1, 2010

Keeping Chickens Mite Free

Filed under: animals, chickens — Tags: , , , , — dmacc502 @ 7:03 pm
A photo of chickens drinking water

Image via Wikipedia

Keep you hen houses and your chickens free from mites.http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/outdoors/8036501/Keeping-chickens-mighty-mites.html#mce_temp_url#

Roasted Pheasants

Filed under: animals, recipes — Tags: , , , — dmacc502 @ 10:13 am
Roast tarragon pheasant

Image by dearbarbie via Flickr

INGREDIENTS

  1. 1/2 pound fresh horseradish, peeled and sliced crosswise 1/4 inch thick
  2. 3 cups water
  3. 1 tablespoon sugar
  4. Salt
  5. 2 tablespoons crème fraîche
  6. 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened
  7. 1 teaspoon chopped thyme
  8. 1 teaspoon chopped rosemary
  9. 1 teaspoon chopped sage
  10. Freshly ground pepper
  11. Two 3-pound pheasants
  12. 1 lemon, quartered

DIRECTIONS

  1. In a covered medium saucepan, simmer the horseradish with 2 cups of the water, the sugar and a large pinch of salt until the horseradish is tender, 30 minutes; drain well. In a food processor, puree the horseradish with the crème fraîche. Scrape the puree into a small bowl and season with salt.
  2. Preheat the oven to 400°. In a small bowl, blend the butter with the thyme, rosemary and sage and season with salt and pepper. Rub 11/2 tablespoons of the herb butter under the skin of each pheasant. Rub the remaining 1 tablespoon of herb butter all over the outside of the birds and season with salt and pepper. Tuck 2 lemon quarters into each cavity and tie the legs with string.
  3. Set the pheasants on an oiled rack in a roasting pan on their sides, and roast for 30 minutes. Carefully turn the birds to the other side and roast for 30 minutes. Turn the pheasants breast side up and roast for 10 minutes. Pour the cavity juices into the roasting pan, pressing lightly on the lemon to release the juice. Transfer the pheasants to a carving board and let rest for 10 minutes.
  4. Set the roasting pan over 2 burners. Add the remaining 1 cup of water and simmer, scraping up the brown bits, until reduced to 3/4 cup, about 3 minutes. Pour the juices into a small saucepan and season with salt and pepper. Keep warm.
  5. Carve the pheasants and arrange on plates. Using 2 soup spoons, scoop the horseradish puree into neat ovals and set them beside the pheasant. Pour the pan juices over the pheasant and serve with the Caramelized Endives with Apples.
  6. http://www.foodandwine.com/recipes/roast-suckling-pig
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