Country Traditions

September 16, 2010

Making Buttermilk

Filed under: Churning butter, farming, making cheese, recipes, Vinegar — Tags: , , , , , — dmacc502 @ 4:46 pm

How to make buttermilk with easy instructions and some recipes for homemade buttermilk.

Buttermilk is a by-product that you get when learning how to make butter. However, when you examine it carefully, it is nowhere near the thick white buttermilk that you can buy from the local store. This is because this buttermilk has had a culture added to it, and it is much thicker than what is left behind after making butter.

However, once you start making your own buttermilk at home, you will realize that what you have made is nothing like the store-bought product either! Instead you will have a far better product that is rich in taste and far superior to what you can buy.

STEP 1: HOW TO MAKE BUTTERMILK – BRING MILK TO ROOM TEMPERATURE

Take your whole milk out that you have bought from the store, or, if you are lucky enough, your own raw milk, and let it sit on the counter in your kitchen for an hour or two. This will bring the milk to room temperature, before the next stage.

STEP 2: HOW TO MAKE BUTTERMILK – ADD THE CULTURE

Take 1 cup of the milk and add either 1 tablespoon of lemon juice, or 1 tablespoon of white vinegar,or 2 tablespoons cream of tarter. Stir through well and leave for 15 minutes or so, until the milk starts to curdle.

STEP 3: HOW TO MAKE BUTTERMILK – BOTTLE AND REFRIGERATE!

Either use straightaway, stirring before drinking, or bottle and place in the fridge. Your buttermilk will keep for a week.

http://www.countryfarm-lifestyles.com/how-to-make-buttermilk.html

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17th Century Household Duties

Compared to present-day families, the seventeenth century household served a wider range of functions and had more porous and flexible boundaries. It served a variety of productive, educational, religious, and welfare roles that have subsequently been shed to other institutions. It was, first and foremost, a unit of economic production, whose size and composition varied according to the household’s labor needs (Mintz & Kellogg, 1988). Inside the household, the division of domestic roles was far less specialized or rigid than it would later become. This was especially true for women. The historian Laurel Thatcher Ulrich has aptly described seventeenth-century mothering as extensive rather than intensive. Households were busy and often crowded places where childrearing responsibilities had to be balanced with other demands on a woman’s time. Mothers were not only responsible for feeding, clothing, supervising, and instructing their own children, but also supervising, disciplining, and training apprentices and servants and assisting in their husband’s economic affairs. An industrious housewife was supposed to be a skilled spinner, sewer, knitter, food processor, brewer, and cook; a productive gardener; a household manufacturer; and a resourceful trader

http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/historyonline/mothersfathers.cfm

September 13, 2010

HOW TO MAKE OLD FASHIONED HEAD CHEESE

Filed under: animals, making cheese, recipes — dmacc502 @ 3:02 am

1 hog’s head, well trimmed and quartered
salt
pepper

Wash quarters well and put in heavy kettle, cover with unsalted water and simmer until meat falls from bones, about 3 hours. Remove from fire and cool until meat can be handled, but do not let it get so cold that the fat congeals. Drain away liquid and pick bones, gristle and fat from meat.

Place meat in wooden chopping bowl and chop it very fine. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Pack meat mixture in several standardsize bread tins to about 3/4 full. Nest one pan on top of another, with waxed paper between each pan, and place a weight on the top pan to press whole properly. Set in cool place overnight. In the morning, slide each loaf from its pan and wrap well in waxed paper. Refrigerate until used.

This head cheese is nothing like the commercial variety and nowadays can be had only from a farmer’s wife who still makes it. It’s wonderfully good, especially in a sandwich.

Making Cheese

Filed under: making cheese, recipes — dmacc502 @ 2:58 am

Making Cheese.

via Making Cheese.

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