Country Traditions

September 17, 2010

Daily Chores

Filed under: Churning butter, farming, laundry, quilting, sewing, wisdom — Tags: , , — dmacc502 @ 12:55 pm

Mondays – Wash Clothes (by hand in sudsy water, ring it, rinse it, ring it, hang it outside to dry. This took all day.)

Tuesdays – Iron ( Iron everything – shirts, pants, and underwear. There was no permanent press – everything was very wrinkly. This took all day.)

Wednesdays – Mend and work on new sewing projects (She sewed patches onto pants and mended socks. My grandmother sewed all of my mother’s clothes until she reached the middle of high school.)

Thursdays – Cleaning of bedrooms and bathrooms (They only had one car which was normal in those days. Grandpa did the grocery shopping and grandma worked the garden.)

Fridays – Cleaning of living room, dining room and kitchen (Grandma baked every day. She made cinnamon rolls, pies, donuts and cakes from scratch.)

Saturdays – Prepare for Sunday by cooking double meals and giving bathsetc. (Grandma always made hamburgers for dinner on Saturdays because they were fast. Then she focused on the Sunday Roast and sheet cake that they would eat after church.)

Sundays – Day of Rest


Grandma’s life was full and busy as she lovingly cared for her family. She served God by serving her family. She worked with eager hands (Prov. 31:13b), she set about her work vigorously (Prov. 31:17), she watched over the affairs of her household and did not eat the bread of idleness (Prov. 31:27). And the most beautiful part was she feared the Lord (Prov. 31:30).

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September 16, 2010

17th Century Household Duties

Compared to present-day families, the seventeenth century household served a wider range of functions and had more porous and flexible boundaries. It served a variety of productive, educational, religious, and welfare roles that have subsequently been shed to other institutions. It was, first and foremost, a unit of economic production, whose size and composition varied according to the household’s labor needs (Mintz & Kellogg, 1988). Inside the household, the division of domestic roles was far less specialized or rigid than it would later become. This was especially true for women. The historian Laurel Thatcher Ulrich has aptly described seventeenth-century mothering as extensive rather than intensive. Households were busy and often crowded places where childrearing responsibilities had to be balanced with other demands on a woman’s time. Mothers were not only responsible for feeding, clothing, supervising, and instructing their own children, but also supervising, disciplining, and training apprentices and servants and assisting in their husband’s economic affairs. An industrious housewife was supposed to be a skilled spinner, sewer, knitter, food processor, brewer, and cook; a productive gardener; a household manufacturer; and a resourceful trader

http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/historyonline/mothersfathers.cfm

September 12, 2010

How to Make a Quilt

Filed under: quilting — Tags: , — dmacc502 @ 12:29 pm

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Quilt making is a fun and rewarding activity that can be enjoyed by people of all ages and skill levels. It is an act of creation of true beauty and an expression of emotion that is captured and shown in the careful choice and preparation of fabric and in the placement of each individual stitch.

The best thing about making your own quilt is that once it is finished you get to share it with your family and friends! A quilt can be used by someone on a day-to-day basis and serve as a constant reminder of the love, care and attention to detail that went into making it. For this reason many quilts are cherished and kept as heirlooms to be passed down to future family generations.

Getting started in quilt making

Making your own quilt is a very hands-on process that is very much a blend of art and skill. To make a quilt from start to finish can be a time-consuming process but it is not overly difficult to do as long as you do not try to rush it. The result at the end of the day is almost always worth the effort so remember just to relax and take your time!

In these pages you will find step-by-step guides to help walk you through all the stages of making a quilt from start to finish. Simply start at the first page and follow as each section leads on to the next, or browse down this list to find help on specific topics that you are stuck on.

Either way, take your time to enjoy the information presented here and hopefully you will find the inspiration to get started and make a quilt of your very own!         http://www.quilting101.com/

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