Country Traditions

September 17, 2010

Daily Chores

Filed under: Churning butter, farming, laundry, quilting, sewing, wisdom — Tags: , , — dmacc502 @ 12:55 pm

Mondays – Wash Clothes (by hand in sudsy water, ring it, rinse it, ring it, hang it outside to dry. This took all day.)

Tuesdays – Iron ( Iron everything – shirts, pants, and underwear. There was no permanent press – everything was very wrinkly. This took all day.)

Wednesdays – Mend and work on new sewing projects (She sewed patches onto pants and mended socks. My grandmother sewed all of my mother’s clothes until she reached the middle of high school.)

Thursdays – Cleaning of bedrooms and bathrooms (They only had one car which was normal in those days. Grandpa did the grocery shopping and grandma worked the garden.)

Fridays – Cleaning of living room, dining room and kitchen (Grandma baked every day. She made cinnamon rolls, pies, donuts and cakes from scratch.)

Saturdays – Prepare for Sunday by cooking double meals and giving bathsetc. (Grandma always made hamburgers for dinner on Saturdays because they were fast. Then she focused on the Sunday Roast and sheet cake that they would eat after church.)

Sundays – Day of Rest


Grandma’s life was full and busy as she lovingly cared for her family. She served God by serving her family. She worked with eager hands (Prov. 31:13b), she set about her work vigorously (Prov. 31:17), she watched over the affairs of her household and did not eat the bread of idleness (Prov. 31:27). And the most beautiful part was she feared the Lord (Prov. 31:30).

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September 16, 2010

Baking Bread in a Coffee Can

Filed under: farming — Tags: , , , — dmacc502 @ 1:37 pm
Wheat flour

Image via Wikipedia

Yeast Bread in a Can

Coffee Can Bread

  • 2 pckg. active dry yeast
  • 2 tbsp. sugar
  • 1 c. warm water (110 F.)
  • cornmeal
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 5 c. all purpose flour
  • 1 1/2 c. warm milk (110 F.)
  • 1/2 tsp. baking soda dissolved in 1 tbls. water

In a large bowl, combine yeast and sugar in the water; let stand 15 minutes or until it begins to rise.

Grease the inside of 3 – 1 lb. metal coffee cans and the underside of their lids.  Sprinkle cans with cornmeal, shaking off the excess.

With electric mixer, gradually beat salt, 3 c. flour, and 1 c. milk to the yeast mixture; adding alternately and beating well.

Add 1/2 tsp. baking soda to 1 tbsp. water and dissolve.  Add this to the beaten mixture.  Beat well.

With mixer or spoon, beat the remaining 1/2 c. milk and about 1 1/2 to 2 c. flour to make a stiff dough that is too sticky to knead.

Spoon enough dough equally into cans, top with lids.  Let rise in a warm place until the lid pops off (about 45 – 60 minutes).

Carefully remove lids.  place cans upright on stove rack and bake at 375 degrees F. for 25-30 minutes until the bread top is golden brown.

Slide out of can to test.  Take loaves out of cans and stand upright on wire rack to cool.

Store airtight and keep at room temperature or in the refrigerator for 4 days.  Freeze for longer storage.

Source – www.about.com

Pumpkin Bread in a Can

  • 2 c. of cooked prepared pumpkin (or 1 large can of pumpkin, drained)
  • 3 c. sugar
  • 1 c. canola, rapeseed or extra light virgin olive oil
  • 3 eggs
  • 3 c. flour
  • 1 c. raisins
  • 1 c. chopped nuts, optional
  • 1 tsp. each of cloves, allspice, salt, baking powder, baking soda
  • 2 tsp. cinnamon

Preheat over to 35o degrees F.

Grease and flour 3 (13 oz) coffee cans (or 2 standard bread pans).

In a large bowl, mix sugar, oil and add eggs one at a time.  Set this mixture aside.  Sift flour and all spices together.

Add flour mixture and pumpkin alternately to the sugar/oil mixture.

Mix just enough to moisten all the dry ingredients; it’s better if you don’t over beat the mixture.

Add raisins and nuts.

Pour mixture into the 3 coffee cans or the 2 loaf pans.  Stir a bit when mixture is in the cans to avoid air bubbles.

Cover loosely with foil.  Bake at 350 degrees for 70-80 minutes.  Cool 10 minutes before loosening from the cans or pans.

http://readynutrition.com/resources/bake-bread-from-a-coffee-can_02032010/

September 15, 2010

Whole Wheat Irish Soda Bread

Filed under: recipes — Tags: , , , — dmacc502 @ 9:08 pm
Rounds of soda bread in various stages of baking.

Image via Wikipedia

Soda breads are hearty Irish staples — wholemeal flour with large flakes of bran and wheat germ, or white flour or a mixture leavened with baking soda and moistened with buttermilk. The acid in the buttermilk reacts with the baking soda, which is an alkali, creating bubbles of carbon dioxide that rise in the bread. Soda breads have the heft of a yeast bread but are made in minutes, and the dough can be shaped into scones or a round loaf, depending on the occasion. Originally it would have been baked in a bastible (pot oven) over the open fire.2 cups whole-wheat flour
2 cups all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon salt
2 1/4 cups buttermilk

Instructions:

  1. Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Coat a baking sheet with cooking spray and sprinkle with a little flour.
  2. Whisk whole-wheat flour, all-purpose flour, baking soda and salt in a large bowl. Make a well in the center and pour in buttermilk. Using one hand, stir in full circles (starting in the center of the bowl working toward the outside of the bowl) until all the flour is incorporated. The dough should be soft but not too wet and sticky. When it all comes together, in a matter of seconds, turn it out onto a well-floured surface. Clean dough off your hand.
  3. Pat and roll the dough gently with floury hands, just enough to tidy it up and give it a round shape. Flip over and flatten slightly to about 2 inches. Transfer the loaf to the prepared baking sheet. Mark with a deep cross using a serrated knife and prick each of the four quadrants.
  4. Bake the bread for 20 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 400 degrees and continue to bake until the loaf is brown on top and sounds hollow when tapped, 30 to 35 minutes more. Transfer the loaf to a wire rack and let cool for about 30 minutes.
  5. http://www.motherearthnews.com

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