Country Traditions

September 28, 2010

German Baby Pancakes

Filed under: cast iron, recipes — Tags: , , , , — dmacc502 @ 8:43 pm
Small maple syrup jug with non-functional loop...

Image via Wikipedia

By: Shirley Smith
“Quick, easy and delicious. Serve with lemon wedges, warm maple syrup and jam.”
Ingredients

3 eggs
3/4 cup milk
3/4 cup all-purpose flour
1/4 cup butter
2 tablespoons confectioners’ sugar
Directions

Preheat oven to 425 degrees F (220 degrees C). Place butter in a 10 inch cast iron skillet and heat the skillet in oven.
Beat eggs at high speed with an electric mixer. Slowly add the milk and flour.
Pour batter into hot skillet. Return skillet to oven and bake for 20 minutes. It will rise like a souffle, then fall when taken out of oven. Lightly dust with powdered sugar and serve.

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September 16, 2010

Homemade Amish Egg Noodles

Filed under: farming — Tags: , , , , — dmacc502 @ 3:16 pm
Tagliatelle carbonara with basil

Image via Wikipedia

In my never ending quest towards self reliance, I purchased a cookbook, The Best of Amish Cooking by Phyllis Pellman Good while I was visiting an Amish town in Pennsylvania.  This book has been, by far one of the best purchases I have ever made.  Everything in this cookbook is wholesome, filling and tasty, including the recipe for noodles.  Nothing beats the taste of homemade noodles, and the Amish have perfected this homestead favorite.

For those that have egg laying hens, this is a great recipe to use up those extra eggs you brought in.  The rich tasting dough is not as hard to make as it has been made out to be.  In fact, this author whipped up some noodles in less than an hour.  The recipe makes 1 pound of noodles, but the recipe can be divided in half for a smaller amount if needed.

Homemade Noodles

*Makes 1 pound

Beat the egg yolks and water together thoroughly.  Stir in the salt and flour to make a very stiff, yet workable dough.  *I added a few extra tbls. of water in mine to work the dough easier.

Divide the dough into four balls.  Roll each one out, making as thin a layer as possible.  Lay each one on a seperate cloth to dry.

When they are dry enough not to stick together, stack them on top of each other and cut them lengthwise into thin strips.  Then cut across the width of the cough to form thin strips, about 1 1/2- 2 inches long.

To Dehydrate Noodles:

Cut the noodle dough into strips and place in your food dehydrator for 5 hours or until the noodles are dried out.  Allow noodles to dry completely before storing them in an airtight container.

To Cook Noodles:

Bring 3 quarts of water to a boil.  Add 1 1/2 tbsp. salt and 1/2 lb. of noodles.  Stir frequently.  After water returns to boil, cook for 8-10 minutes.  Drain and serve.

http://readynutrition.com/resources/homemade-amish-egg-noodles_01092010/

September 12, 2010

Collect, Clean and Store Chicken Eggs

Filed under: animals, chickens — Tags: , , — dmacc502 @ 11:26 pm
Chicken eggs

Image via Wikipedia

Are those pretty layers that you bought in spring starting to lay eggs? Wondering what the best way is to clean them? It isn’t quite as straightforward as you think, and different sources give differing opinions on the best way to clean chicken eggs.

Gathering the Eggs

First things first. Before you worry about cleaning them, you have to gather the eggs. There are things you can do to make sure that the eggs you gather are as clean as possible, minimizing the amount of cleaning you must do.

Keep nest boxes well-feathered. Make sure the hens’ nest boxes have plenty of shavings or straw lining them. If there’s poop in the nest boxes, clean it out well when you collect the eggs and replace the straw or shavings. Likewise, if a hen has broken an egg, clean out the mess thoroughly, removing all wet or soiled straw.

Gather eggs early and often. One of the biggest reasons for poopy or broken eggs is allowing them to sit overnight in the nest boxes. Some of my hens seem to prefer to roost on the edges of the nest boxes, or even in them! (Bad hens!) Overnight, they poop on the eggs if there are any in the boxes, or step on them, breaking the shells. This makes for a lot more work if we miss a day of egg collecting. If you can manage it, collecting eggs twice a day can help keep them really clean, and also discourages egg eating.

Cleaning the Eggs

Before you submerge the freshly collected eggs in ice water, wait! Cold water actually causes the pores in an eggshell to pull bacteria from the surface in through the shell and into the egg, where you don’t want it. What’s more, unwashed eggs have a natural antibacterial coating called bloom.

Dry cleaning. If possible, dry clean your eggs. This means using something abrasive to rub off any dirt or poop until the egg is clean. This method preserves most of the bloom intact. Use a sanding sponge, loofah, sandpaper, or abrasive sponge of some kind to dry clean your eggs. Be sure to sanitize the sanding sponge, or whatever you’re using to clean the eggs, occasionally.

Wet cleaning. If your eggs are just too gross to dry clean (they sometimes get egg yolk from a broken egg on them, and once dried, this is impossible to remove dry), you can use water to clean them. Make sure to use water that is warmer than the egg temperature – medium warmth, not hot, but not tepid, either.

Do not immerse the eggs in water or let them stand in water. We wash the eggs under running water from the faucet. Another method is to spray the eggs in washer flats or wire baskets with warm water, let them sit, then wipe them with a dry paper towel one at a time. Place clean eggs into another basket or flat.

Follow this with a sanitizing spray, using bleach diluted in water for the spray mixture. Then allow the eggs to dry on a rack or in a basket or washer flat.

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