Country Traditions

October 18, 2010

Home Accessories: Dish Towels as Curtains

Filed under: decorating, family, wisdom — Tags: , , , , — dmacc502 @ 2:31 pm
A country farmyard of chickens, decorative tea...

Image by Decorative Towels by Cath. via Flickr

Home Accessories: Dish Towels as Curtains

Always a good idea: linen tea towels serving as curtains. They look natural and airy, and we love decorating with things we already own. Here’s a roundup of some recently admired tea towel installations.

Above: Photo via the kitchn.

Above: Photo via Verhext.

Above: Here’s a clever idea for creating a casual window covering: tea towels stitched together to make an airy kitchen curtain (especially if you stick to like-colored towels). Photo by Polly Wreford.

Above: For the less motivated among us; an instant curtain idea (via photographer Simon Brown) involving an impromptu curtain rod, a square of linen (doesn’t even need to be hemmed), and a pack of wooden clothespins

http://www.care2.com/greenliving/home-accessories-dish-towels-as-curtains.html

September 14, 2010

How to make table linen

Filed under: sewing — Tags: , , , — dmacc502 @ 12:32 pm
Embroidery in pedrle cotton yarn on cotton-lin...

Image via Wikipedia

Making time: table linen imageAppliqué can transform a plain tablecloth into something stylish, in any design you choose

Appliqué is an easy way to completely transform a plain, vintage tablecloth into something contemporary and stylish, and at the same time cover up any stains! You could also use a vintage linen or heavy cotton sheet – I used an embroidered Swiss cotton sheet which was in perfect condition and wonderfully heavy. If you want to start with new fabric, organic cotton sheeting is ideal – it is extra wide, 2.85m/112in., so you can easily buy a piece big enough for even the largest dining table.

What you need

A hand sewing kit
Safety pins
Items to use as circle templates – plates, jars, CDs
Large piece of organic cotton, vintage tablecloth or vintage sheet
Scraps of medium-weight, washable fabrics which don’t fray too much
Embroidery threads

Note: You may prefer to iron lightweight interfacing onto the fabric scraps before cutting them out. It stops the fabrics from fraying and wrinkling

How to make it

Making time: table linen steps 1 & 2 compositeMark any stains with safety pins before covering them up with fabric circles

1. Pre-wash the base fabric and all the scraps you use for this project as you don’t want colours running in the wash. Also use a dye grabber when you wash, to catch any excess. Wash and iron the tablecloth/sheet/fabric. Mark any stains with safety pins so you can easily find them to cover with appliqué. If you are using new fabric, cut to the required size and hem all the edges.

2. Cut circles from medium-weight fabrics in a range of different sizes, from 6-20cm/21/2-8in. I used about 60 for this project. Spread out the cloth and pin the circles in a nice arrangement over the cloth, covering any stains if necessary. Pin in place, again using safety pins.

Making time: table linen step 3 compositeSew around the circle’s edges using either slipstitch or blanket stitch

3. Starting at one side of the cloth, sew the circles down. Sew around the edges of each circle using either slipstitch (a) or blanket stitch (b). Slipstitch is much faster, so it depends how long you are prepared to work on the tablecloth! Tack or use more pins if required and smooth out each circle to ensure it doesn’t wrinkle as you sew. Press when all the appliqués are attached.

It is quick and easy to make vintage linen napkins to match by sewing just a few small circles onto one corner of each napkin.

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