Country Traditions

January 9, 2011

Pheasant recipes: A pot full of deliciousness – Telegraph

Filed under: animals, family, herbs, recipes — Tags: , , , — dmacc502 @ 9:19 am

 

Pheasant recipes: A pot full of deliciousness – Telegraph.

 

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November 2, 2010

Sauces, Salad Dressings: Herb Vinegar Recipe

Filed under: decorating, family, farming, gardening, herbs, recipes, Vinegar — Tags: , , , , , — dmacc502 @ 1:13 pm
Vinegar is commonly infused with spices or her...

Image via Wikipedia

One of the simplest recipes for using herbs is this 19th-century hint for making flavored vinegar: Pour plain vinegar over herbs in a bottle and let it sit for a month in the sun. What could be easier?

See more about homemade vinegars in our “Great Gifts from the Kitchen” article.

1 cup fresh herbs (basil, tarragon or thyme, for example)

1 quart vinegar

Place herbs in a clean quart jar. Heat vinegar just to the boiling point and pour it over the herbs, filling the jar to the top. Seal and store in a cool, dark place for at least three weeks for the fullest flavor. Strain the vinegar into 2 pint bottles and add a fresh sprig of the herb. (Use decorative bottles if you’re planning to give these as gifts.)

You can use a single herb in plain white vinegar, or try a medley of herbs in other vinegars. Here are a few suggestions to get you started, but feel free to experiment and invent your own blends:

–white vinegar with tarragon leaves, basil leaves, and peeled shallots

–sherry vinegar with fresh rosemary leaves, minced horseradish, or chopped dried chilies

red wine vinegar with sage, parsley, and shallots

via Sauces, Salad Dressings: Herb Vinegar Recipe.

via Sauces, Salad Dressings: Herb Vinegar Recipe.

October 18, 2010

Natural Remedies: Hair and Skin

Hair Style.

Image by Magdalene Sun via Flickr

Remedies

  • Use lemon juice as a rinse over freshly washed hair to induce natural highlights, especially if you’re a blond. It’s instant sunshine for your hair, in a fruit.
  • Beer has long been used—even by professionals—as a setting lotion and conditioner. Pour straight from the can or bottle, comb through and rinse.
  • Mayonnaise, straight from the jar, will make hair soft and shiny. The egg nourishes brittle hair with protein, while the vinegar gives it body and bounce.
  • Try this mixture to regain supple hair: Mix one teaspoon powdered brewers’ yeast with four ounces of apple cider vinegar to create an after wash rinse. Pour it over wet hair and let stand at least a minute before rinsing.

Problem: Oily hair and skin

Remedies

  • Add one teaspoon baking soda to two ounces of your shampoo. This works as an alkali to absorb excess oil.
  • Baking soda works the same way with skin, it will absorb oil and also neutralize excess acid in your skin. Make a paste with baking soda and water.
  • Try lemon juice as an astringent facial cleanser.

Problem: Dry skin

Remedies

  • For a homemade scrub, mix ground oats and honey. Rub all over your face—especially your nose. The abrasive will remove dry, scaly skin while the honey seeps in as a moisturizer. Rinse completely off and pat dry, and your skin will be glowing and baby soft. Only use this remedy once a week.
  • Plain honey is an excellent remedy for chapped lips. Leave on overnight—it makes for sweet dreams!
  • For superdry skin, use olive oil. Rub it in prior to a bath or shower. You may substitute peanut, sesame or sunflower oil.
  • A quart of milk in a hot bath is a luxury as well as a skin toner. It’s a trick nearly as old as time.

Problem: Puffy, tired-looking eyes

Remedy

  • Used teabags make excellent eye cosmetics. After dunked, drain it and place it over your closed eye (one for each) and hold it there for a few minutes. Redness, soreness, swelling and irritation will disappear like magic.

http://www.almanac.com/content/natural-remedies-hair-and-skin

October 1, 2010

Roast Suckling Pig Recipe by Jane Sigal

Filed under: animals, recipes — Tags: , , , — dmacc502 @ 10:06 am
Roast Suckling Pig

Image via Wikipedia

INGREDIENTS

  1. 20-pound suckling pig
  2. 10 crushed garlic cloves
  3. 5 rosemary sprigs
  4. 5 thyme sprigs
  5. Olive oil
  6. Fleur de sel
  7. Sea salt

DIRECTIONS

  1. On a nonflammable surface, such as brick, cement or gravel, build a 6-by-2-foot hardwood log or charcoal fire.
  2. Rig a 20-pound suckling pig onto a spit fitted with a spit fork to grip the rear haunches. Using a heavy-duty trussing needle and twine, tie the pig to the spit behind the head and close to the tail. Stuff the belly with 10 crushed garlic cloves, 5 rosemary sprigs and 5 thyme sprigs. Using a small trussing needle and twine, sew the belly shut. Brush the pig with olive oil.
  3. Mount the spit on its tripods so that the spit stands 1 foot off the ground, just to the side of a long edge of the fire. Lay two disposable aluminum roasting pans or two sheets of heavy-duty foil under the pig to catch the drippings. Turn on the spit.
  4. Set an oven thermometer on an upturned cinder block close to the pig. The ambient temperature should stay between 225 and 250. Add a layer of fresh coals every 30 minutes, as needed; although you will likely use 20 pounds of coals, it’s a good idea to keep up to 60 pounds on hand. Roast the pig for about 2 hours, or until a meat thermometer inserted in the thickest part of the shoulder and rear haunch registers 145.
  5. Remove the spit from the heat and let the pig rest for 30 minutes. Transfer the pig to a large work surface lined with heavy-duty foil. Untie the pig from the spit. Discard the twine, peel off the skin, carve the meat, sprinkle with fleur de sel or sea salt and serve.
  6. http://www.foodandwine.com/recipes/roast-suckling-pig

September 17, 2010

Uses for Salt & Baking Soda

Filed under: curing meat, dehydrating, farming, freezing food, home remedies, poison ivy, recipes — Tags: , , , — dmacc502 @ 3:18 pm
Sodium bicarbonate, sodium hydrogencarbonate, ...

Image via Wikipedia

  • Rub salt on fruit stains while still wet, then put them in the wash.
  • For mildew spots, rub in salt and some buttermilk, and then let dry in the sun.
  • If you spill wine or fruit juice on your tablecloth, pour salt on the spot immediately to absorb the stain.
  • Apply a paste of salt and olive oil to ugly heat rings on your table. Let sit for about an hour and then wipe off with a soft cloth.
  • To improve your iron, sprinkle salt on a piece of paper and run the sticky iron over it a few times while the iron is hot.
  • To restore some of the color to faded fabric, soak it in a strong solution of salt and water.
  • Mix a tablespoon of salt into the water of a vase of cut flowers to keep them fresh longer.
  • A mixture of salt and vinegar will clean brass.
  • Salt on the fingers when cleaning meat or fish will prevent your hands from slipping.
  • To kill unwanted weeds growing in your driveway or between bricks and stones, pour boiling salt water over them.
  • For perspiration stains, add enough water to salt to make a paste, then rub into the cloth. Wait for an hour, and then launder as usual.
  • Cover spilled eggs with salt, then wipe clean with a paper towel.
  • To freshen smelly sneakers (or any canvas shoe) sprinkle their insides with salt. Wait 24 hours for the salt to absorb the odor, and then shake them out.
  • Pour salt directly onto a grease spill and come back to it later.
  • A new broom will last longer if you soak the bristles in hot salt water before using it for the first time.
  • Stainless steel can be cleaned by rubbing it with a gritty paste of two tablespoons of salt mixed with lemon juice. Rinse well and pat dry with a soft cloth.
  • Rub two to three tablespoons of salt onto the stains inside your glass vases, and then scrub clean with a damp bristle brush.
  • Gargle with warm salt water (1/4 teaspoon salt to one cup water) to relieve a sore throat.
  • Sprinkle salt on carpets to dry out muddy footprints before vacuuming.
  • When silk flowers get dusty, put them in a paper bag with several tablespoons of salt and shake gently for two minutes to clean them.
  • Refresh household sponges by soaking them in cold salt water for ten minutes.
  • BAKING SODA
  • Add baking soda to your bath water to relieve sunburned or itchy skin.
  • Make a paste of baking soda and water, and apply to a burn or an insect bite for relief.
  • Clean your refrigerator with a solution of one-teaspoon baking soda to one quart of warm water.
  • Pour a cup of baking soda into the opening of your clogged drain and then add a cup of hot vinegar. After a few minutes, flush the drain with a quart of boiling water.
  • To remove perspiration stains, make a thick paste of baking soda and water. Rub paste into the stain, let it sit for an hour, and then launder as usual.
  • If you crave sweets, rinse your mouth with one-teaspoon baking soda dissolved in a glass of warm water. Don’t swallow the mixture; spit it out. Your craving should disappear instantly.
  • Add a pinch of baking soda to boiled syrup to prevent it from crystallizing.
  • To remove pesticides, dirt, and wax from fresh fruits and vegetables, wash them in a large bowl of cool water to which you’ve added two to three tablespoons of baking soda.
  • Soak toothbrushes in baking soda and warm water overnight to clean bristles.
  • Gasoline and oil odors can be removed by putting clothes in a trash bag with baking soda for a few days before washing them.
  • Lay down barrier of baking soda under sink-pipe openings and along basement windows to keep carpenter ants, silverfish, and roaches from invading. Roaches eat the baking soda, dehydrate, and die.
  • A light baking soda paste on a damp cloth will remove bugs and tar from cars without damaging the paint. Let paste sit for a few minutes before wiping and rinsing clean.
  • To remove stains from your coffee and tea cups, wipe them with a damp sponge dipped in baking soda paste.
  • Keep your rubber gloves dry and smelling good by sprinkling baking soda inside them. They’ll slip on more easily too!
  • Sprinkling baking soda on your front steps will provide traction and melt the ice. Unlike rock salt, kitty litter, or sand, it won’t damage outdoor or indoor surfaces or shoes.
  • Boil two inches of water in a pan with a burned bottom, turn off the heat, then add half a cup of baking soda. Let it sit overnight. In the morning it will be easy to clean.
  • Sprinkle a teaspoon of baking soda on the bottom of your toaster oven to eliminate the burned smell from drippings and crumbs.
  • A paste of baking soda removes red sauce stains from plastic.

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