Country Traditions

September 27, 2010

The Four Fundamentals of Successful Fishing

Filed under: animals, fish, wisdom — Tags: , , , — dmacc502 @ 2:01 pm
Smallmouth Bass from Eagle Lake in Ontario, Ca...

Image via Wikipedia

Here are some tried-and-truefishing tips from an expert fisherman.

Be at the right place at the right time.

General rules regarding the right time are as follows:

  • Trout are abundant when water temperatures are between 50ºF and 55ºF. For fly-fishermen, this is when mayflies are hatching and trout are feeding at the surface, usually from dusk to dark during the summer. For bait fishermen, the right time is early spring, when stream levels rise.
  • Smallmouth bass are abundant during spawning season (late May to early June) wherever the law allows. Cast to the shoreline with fly-rod lures.
  • Largemouth bass are all-season feeders, with depth more important than time. They will cruise the shoreline after dark, so use a flashlight sparingly.
  • Northern pike, pickerel, and panfish are all-season biters as well.
  • Walleyes can be caught during spawning runs where legal (late April and early May). After spawning, look along shorelines, where they tend to cruise in schools.
  • Landlocked salmon are ready from ice-out until surface temperatures approach 60ºF.
  • Bullheads feed most actively at night.

Fish at the proper depth.

Determining the right depth is of critical importance, especially in lake fishing.

  • Shallow depths are tolerated by northern pike, pickerel, largemouth bass, and panfish. They can be caught throughout the season in water bordering weed beds, around sunken brush, and in the shade.
  • Thermocline-level fish dwell approximately 20 to 35 feet below the surface, and include trout, walleye, and smallmouth bass. They are attracted to hot spots such as drop-offs and sunken reefs. Once you’ve found them, fish natural baits within inches of the bottom.

Use the correct bait or lure.

Most species have a particular preference:

Baits

  • Nightcrawlers are preferred by trout, smallmouth bass, walleye, bullheads, small catfish, and eels.
  • Crayfish are preferred by trout, largemouth bass, and smallmouth bass.
  • Minnows are preferred by trout, northern pike, pickerel, smallmouth bass, and walleye.
  • Smelt is preferred by landlocked salmon.

Lures

  • Streamers attract trout, largemouth bass, and smallmouth bass.
  • Plugs attract smallmouth and largemouth bass.
  • Popping bugs attract northern pike, pickerel, panfish, smallmouth bass, and largemouth bass.
  • Wobblers attract landlocked salmon, walleye, and trout.

Use the proper presentation.

Even if you follow the three steps above, you can still come home empty-handed because of faulty presentation.

  • Remember, natural baits appeal to fish hunger. Lures draw strikes by exciting fish to attack.
  • Use the smallest hooks, lightest sinkers, and finest lines and leaders that are practical. This will avoid causing alarm and suspicion.
  • The secret of success with lures is erratic retrieves. Experiment with different variations.

Following these tips will improve your chances of a good catch but will not guarantee it. On some days, the fish win. Remember, only a poor loser begrudges a worthy opponent his share of victory.

http://bit.ly/aStvRC

by Harold Blaisdell

Source: The 1981 Old Farmer’s Almanac

September 12, 2010

Fishing Tips

Filed under: animals — Tags: , , , — dmacc502 @ 4:58 pm
  • Never a bad time for fishing.

    One hour before and one hour after high tides, and one hour before and one hour after low tides. Inland, the times for high tides correspond with the times when the Moon is due south. Low tides are halfway between high tides.

  • During the “morning rise” (after sunup for a spell) and the “evening rise” (just before sundown and the hour or so after).
  • When the barometer is steady or on the rise. (But even during stormy periods, the fish aren’t going to give up feeding. The smart fisherman will find just the right bait.)
  • When there is a hatch of flies—caddis flies or mayflies, commonly. (The fisherman will have to match his fly with the hatching flies or go fishless.)
  • When the breeze is from a westerly quarter rather than from the north or east.
  • When the water is still or rippled, rather than during a wind.

Tackle-Box Checklist

  • Fishing line
  • Bobbers
  • Swivels, to keep fishing line from twisting
  • Leaders
  • Sinkers
  • Different sizes of hooks
  • Pliers, to help remove hooks
  • Stringer, to hold all the fish you catch
  • Sharp knife
  • Ruler/scale
  • Flashlight
  • First-aid kit
  • Insect repellent
  • Sunscreen
  • Unscented soap to wash your hands before handling bait. –suggested by Jerry Buerge

Reader Suggestions

  • The best way to fish in South Texas with chicken liver, is to let it sit a while in the good Texas sun, sprinkle a little garlic powder and a little chili powder. This combination makes the liver pasty and it will stay on your triple or single hook with little to no problem. I do offer a warning, that pow you will feel on your line is going to be one big Texas size catfish, so get ready and have some good Texas fishing fun. –Ramiro Vela
  • A really good bait I have found is hot dogs with chicken meat. Cut them in desired pieces and set in the sun to ‘dry up’. When they are ‘dried’, they will stay on the hook better. You can put them in a bag in the freezer to keep. Brim and catfish will bite this bait. –Jean Cannon
  • The best catfish bait are catalpa worms. You can put what you don’t use in the freezer with a few catalpa tree leaves. When you are ready to fish again, take them out and they come back to life. Start reeling in the big cats. –Joey Brown
  • To find the big cats, it would help out if you knew the underwater structure of the pond, river or lake. Find DEEP holes with lots of cover as in over-hangs. Gravel pits are a great place to fish for cats. –Todd Heil
  • The best catfish bait that I have found fishing for catfish anywhere bar none is shrimp, yeah it’s a little costly but let me tell ya somethin’ friend, it’s worth it. –Chuck Hubbard Jr.
  • I am Blackfoot American Native. We live to fish and hunt our meals. A true hint in catfishing is never to use any type of scents (Cologne, powders, perfume, etc.) Don’t handle cigarettes or any type of tobacco products without washing your hands before applying baits, hooks, sinkers, new line, etc. The fish know these things. –Tommy Bays
  • The absolute best way I know to keep your liver on your hook while fishing is: Buy 1 or 2 old plastic ice trays. Go ahead and bait your hook the best you can. I use a “threading” action. Place the hook and liver into the ice tray and let it freeze throughout the night before you go fishing. When you are ready to go fishing, just twist the old ice trays and take the liver cubes and pack them in a bag and put them in a container of ice.  –Chris Payne
  • In Kentucky where I live we use bait store crickets and mill worms floated with a bobber. Put three or four crickets and a couple of mill worms on a hook and hold on! You have you try different depths until you find the fish. Once you find them you can have a lot of fun catching all sizes. I have caught them from squeakers to 62 pounds on this bait, so good luck! –Kenny Conley
  • I’m 68 years old and fish every chance I get. My daddy always told me to watch the cows. If they are up and eating, go fishing. If they are down resting, you might as well stay home. So far this has worked pretty well. –Edna James
  • The best bait I have used here in Bradenton, Fla. is fresh mullet that has never been frozen. Catch them late afternoon or at night. Catch them as long as your leg. Good Luck! –Bill Suggs
  • As the water in your minnow bucket warms the minnows will slowly die. They need a very cool temperature to survive. Never put ice cubes in with live minnows. The chlorine in the water stays and will kill your bait. Freeze water bottles then gently place them in the bucket. Usually one will be enough. –Alec Plummer

Apples and bats

Filed under: animals, gardening — Tags: , — dmacc502 @ 1:43 pm

And so to bed: Put up bat boxes on the north sides of walls and trees. Photograph: David Levene for the Guardian

Order your apples

The apple planting season (autumn and winter) is coming; for the greatest choice of varieties, order now. Adam’s Apples (run by a real, actual man called Adam) has an impressive range. If you have space, go for a collection hand-selected to suit your postcode. Choose between apples for cordons and espaliers, or a “longest season” collection, which will keep you appled up from August to February.

Attracting bats

In the next month, bats move from their summer roosts – near good sources of food – to cooler roosts for hibernation. Put up bat boxes on the north sides of walls and trees if you want them to hang at yours over winter. You may still get a little crepuscular swooping at this time of year, as your pipistrelles and brown long-eareds fatten themselves up for the big sleep. If your garden sees no bat action, sow a bat-attracting wildflower seed mix now. Find mix and roosting boxes at nickys-nursery.co.uk.

Blog at WordPress.com.