Country Traditions

November 14, 2010

A Guide to Saving Seeds | Care2 Healthy & Green Living

Filed under: dehydrating, family, farming, gardening, herbs, weather, wisdom — Tags: , , , , — dmacc502 @ 7:19 am
Fennel seed

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A Guide to Saving Seeds | Care2 Healthy & Green Living.

via A Guide to Saving Seeds | Care2 Healthy & Green Living.

How to Save Seeds

There are two main types of seed saving depending on the type of plant: wet processing and dry processing.

Wet Processing

Very simply, when the fruit of the plant is fully ripe, separate the seeds from the flesh of the fruit, wash them, and air-dry them on a non-stick surface. During washing, any seeds that float can be discarded as this is usually a sign of a non-viable seed. Some fruits and vegetables in this category are squash and melons.

Exceptions

Some seeds, like tomato seeds, actually have to be fermented to become viable. For tomatoes, mush up the fruit (with seeds) and add to a quart jar filled 2/3 with water. Let this sit for about a week (it will be fermenting during this time), then rinse, dry, and store the seeds in an air-tight, dry, and sterile-as-possible location, where the temperature will remain cool.

Dry Processing

You might have read in the Bible about threshing and winnowing. Well, when it comes to saving seed, those skills are just as valuable today as they were back then. Threshing is separating a seed from its coating, usually by beating it or whipping the dry plant on the ground. Winnowing is separating the seeds from the chaff, traditionally by enlisting the help of the wind. For some plants, this can all be achieved by hand, as with beans. With beans, simply crack open the dry pod and remove the seeds. Other dry-processed plants include broccoli, cabbage, carrots, most herbs, flowers, and grains. Storage is the same as for wet-processed seeds.

Other Plant Varieties

Of course, some plants are propagated by means other than seed planting. For instance, potatoes can be stored through the winter, then each eye can be cut out and planted. Most fruit trees are propagated through cuttings. The methods listed above are general principles of seed saving. There are excellent books and online resources which will provide further information about specific plants.

Related:
4 Reasons to Grow Heirloom Plants
10 Tips for Harvesting Your Kitchen Garden
Grow Your Own Food!

Read more: http://www.care2.com/greenliving/a-guide-to-saving-seeds.html#ixzz15G6D6Spl

 

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October 26, 2010

Petunias Seeds to Save – iVillage

Filed under: farming, gardening, weather — Tags: , , , — dmacc502 @ 7:46 am
A container garden of petunias, daisies, marig...

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Petunias Seeds to Save – iVillage.

via Petunias Seeds to Save – iVillage. Click link for list of 10

Petunias

“Be careful not to cull from common petunia hybrids,” warns Milliken. (Hybrid offspring are either sterile or will not resemble the parent.) “But otherwise gathering the seed is very straightforward.”

October 19, 2010

Plants by Type: herb

Filed under: gardening, herbs — Tags: , , , , — dmacc502 @ 6:53 am
Mentha x piperita var. citrata 'Eau de Cologne...

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We’ve chosen North America’s most popular garden plants and provided “how to” gardening information to help you prepare, plant, and care for them.

For each plant, we’ve identified the hardiness zone, sun exposure, soil type, soil pH, pests and problems, harvest tips, recommended varieties, and special features. You’ll also find recipes, free e-cards, and a dose of wit & wisdom. Just click on an image below to view that plant’s growing guide.

Or, click the links below to browse by plant type:

VegetablesFruitHerbsFlowersShrubs

http://www.almanac.com/plants/type/herb?utm_source=Almanac%20Companion&utm_campaign=2e528bec3b-Companion_October_19_2010&utm_medium=email

September 12, 2010

Succession Gardening: Planting Dates for Second Crops

Filed under: gardening — Tags: , , , — dmacc502 @ 6:06 pm

A second harvest can dramatically increase your yield—and allow you to enjoy fresh vegetables into fall and winter. In addition, fall gardening is often easier since there are less pests and problems in cooler weather. Finally, a fall “cover” crop can organically protect and build your soil.

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