Country Traditions

March 15, 2011

Spring Tonics Dandelions Greens Nettles

Filed under: gardening, herbs, home remedies — Tags: , , , — dmacc502 @ 6:34 am
Comparison of the yellow flower and parachute ...

Image via Wikipedia

Dandelions Tonic

Dandelions were so valued that they were cultivated in gardens.

Try using the tender young leaves in salads, either fresh or blanched, as the French and Dutch settlers favored.

Or, use the leaves as one would spinach or make them into soup.�(Those who boiled dandelion greens in water often made a point of drinking the “pot likker” or cooking water, which was, in fact, loaded with water-soluble vitamins.)

Did you know? Dandelions can also be used as a relaxing body rub. See our Natural Remedies for Stress and Anxiety.

Rhubarb Tonic

Rhubarb, or pieplant, was widely regarded as a fine spring tonic to aid the blood and the digestive system.�Cooked and stewed rhubarb was called “spring fruit” in early cookbooks.

Boil rhubarb and enjoy it as a soup (with some sweetener). Rhubarb is also delicious in preserves, puddings, and pies.

via Spring Tonics Dandelions Greens Nettles.

Advertisements

September 28, 2010

Minestrone Soup With Chicken

Filed under: chickens, freezing food, herbs, recipes — Tags: , , , — dmacc502 @ 11:14 am
self-made bouillon de volaille (chicken broth).

Image via Wikipedia

This hearty Italian soup is a contemporary version of a soup that required hours on the stovetop. This recipe calls for canned beans, chicken broth, and tomatoes, which allow you to prepare this entrée soup in just 15 minutes. While the soup cooks, heat a loaf of crusty bread and toss a green salad to make the healthful meal complete.

Ingredients

    1 tbsp. olive oil
    1 carrot, cut into 1/8-inch slices
    ¼ c. minced onion
    2 cloves garlic, minced
    Two 14 ½-ounce cans chicken broth
    One 14 ½-ounce can diced tomatoes, with juice
    One 14 ½-ounce cannellini beans, drained and rinsed (see Tip)
    4 ounces boneless, skinless chicken breast halves, cut into ½-inch squares
    1 zucchini, halved lengthwise and cut into ¼-inch slices
    ½ c. elbow macaroni
    2 tbsp. minced fresh basil, or ½ tsp. dried
    1 tbsp. minced fresh oregano, or ½ tsp. dried
    ¼ tsp. pepper, or to taste
    Salt to taste
    Freshly ground pepper and freshly grated Parmesan cheese for garnish

Preparation

Heat the olive oil in a large saucepan or Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Add the carrot, onion, and garlic; cook, stirring occasionally, for 2 minutes, or until the carrot is crisp-tender and the onion is translucent and not browned.

Stir in the chicken broth and tomatoes with juice; bring to a boil over high heat. Stir in the beans, chicken, zucchini, macaroni, dried basil and oregano (if using), and pepper. When the liquid returns to a boil, reduce the heat to medium; cover and cook for 10 minutes, or until the chicken is cooked through and the pasta and vegetables are tender. Stir in the fresh basil and oregano (if using). Taste and adjust the seasoning.

Advance Preparation

This soup will keep, covered and refrigerated, for up to 4 days.

http://www.kpho.com/food/1941143/detail.html?treets=pho&tml=pho_food&ts=T&tmi=pho_food_1_11000209282010

September 14, 2010

The Ultimate Chicken Stock

Filed under: chickens, recipes — Tags: , , , — dmacc502 @ 4:58 pm
This is a curly leaved parsley plant (the comm...

Image via Wikipedia

THE ULTIMATE CHICKEN STOCK
makes 3-4 quarts

Note: This recipe calls for no salt. It’s generally best to add salt once you know how it’s going to be used. If you salt your stock and then reduce it for a demi-glâce or a sauce, you may find it way too salty.

2-3 pounds bony chicken parts, including necks, backs, wings and feet
gizzards from one chicken, optional
4 quarts cold filtered water
2 tablespoons organic cider vinegar
1 large onion, skin on and coarsely chopped
3 celery ribs, coarsely chopped
1-2 leeks, white and light green part only, cleaned and coarsely chopped
1 bunch parsley

Cut chicken parts into several smaller pieces. Place in a large stainless steel pot with the water, vinegar and vegetables (except the parsley). Let stand for 40 minutes. Bring to a boil, and skim off and discard any scum that rises to the top. Then reduce the heat to low, cover and gently simmer for as few as 6 or up to 24 hours. The longer you cook the stock, the richer and more flavorful it will be.

About 10 minutes before taking the stock off the heat, stir in the bunch of parsley. This imparts additional minerals to the stock. Turn the heat off, and allow to cool slightly before removing chicken pieces with a slotted spoon.

Pour the stock through a fine mesh strainer into a large bowl or jar and refrigerate, covered. A layer of fat will rise to the top and congeal. Skim off this fat and save to use if you like. (I keep mine in a jar in the fridge, using it to roast vegetables, fry potatoes or baste roasting chicken.) Reserve the stock in covered containers in your fridge or freezer. It will keep in your fridge for 3-4 days; if you want to keep it there longer, you need to boil it again. In the freezer it will keep for several months, but you will use it up before then: in soups, sauces, rice, etc.

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.